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HISTORY AND PURPOSE:

The Belgians were a rustic, brave dog, known for exceptional intelligence, athleticism and trainability. They were found working with the farmer – herding sheep and other small livestock; protecting home and property; and doing varied tasks for the modest working people of Belgium.They were prized in their homeland as police dogs and as war dogs.

The Belgians share a common ancestry. Originally classified as simply long hair, short hair, and rough haired, irrespective of coloring, to this day in their homeland they remain a single breed with varieties, named according to their phenotype, or appearance, which is not always the same as their parents.

How the Belgians got their names

The Belgian coat types were always diverse, born as varying coat types often within same litters of the Belgian Sheep Dog breed (Le Berge Belge). The specific variety names evolved in recognition of areas around Brussels where a fancier or group of fanciers became known for selecting and maintaining one of these coat types.

The short coated Malinois was named for the Maline region to the north. The long coated black Groenendael, known by us as the Belgian Sheepdog, was developed by the owner of a famous restaurant, the Chateau de Groenendael. The Tervuren got its name from the village of Tervueren (now spelled Tervuren), where a brewer, M.C. Corbeel, selected and bred together his long-haired blacked fawn dogs, born from black dogs, in about 1895. Another variety, the rough coated Laeken, is named for Laken, near Brussels. After the World Wars, the modern Tervuren evolved anew from long coats born in litters of Malinois, which were then bred to Groenendael and selected out again for their coat coloring.

 

 malinois3908w  groenendaelw  tervmalew  laekenoisw

The first breed standard for the Berger Belge was put into effect in 1892. The breed was at first divided into three varieties with no distinction of color: the long-haired, the short-haired, and the rough-haired.

 The Belgians evolve into 3 AKC breeds

The first Belgians arrived in the United States in 1908. They were shown in the ring along with other shepherd breeds, as Continental Shepherds. The black Groenendael was the predominate long-haired variety for many years, both in the U.S. as well as in Europe.

The two World Wars had a devastating impact on the Belgians abroad, especially the Tervuren coloring, which did not yet have a large following. Today there are no existing lines of any Belgian varieties remaining in the United States that can be traced back to dogs that were in this country before World War II. Following World War II, the Tervuren as we know it today was revived anew by supporters in Europe, selecting long-haired blackened fawn and gray dogs produced from Groenendael and Malinois breedings.

 Belgians were shown as one breed in the U.S., dominated by the black Groenendael, until 1959. In 1953 a few breeders imported Tervuren puppies from France with the intent of breeding and showing them. This caused quite a stir among some of the black dog fanciers, who were concerned about color issues. So in 1959 the AKC gave each variety separate breed status.

The black dogs, having the greatest number of registrations, took on the original breed name of Belgian Sheepdog. The Tervuren and Malinois formed new clubs and drew up their own breed standards. The Lakenois was not included in AKC registration, but today holds FSS registration status and is now shown in performance events. The Lakenois remains to this day dependent upon occasional breeding to the Malinois to improve health and fix type.

And so it is that the Belgian breeds indeed have much in common.

Of course, in the AKC show ring each is shown under the breed standard set forth by its parent club. While there are significant differences in emphasis, faults and disqualifications, the ideals remain essentially the same across the board, except for coat or color.

If you judge in Canada

Please note to those who judge in Canada: The Belgians there are shown as one breed, The Belgian Shepherd Dog, consisting of all four varieties, the Groenendael, Laeken, Malinois and Tervuren.

wylie5876wPurpose:

The Belgians were a rustic, brave dog, known for exceptional intelligence. They were found working with the farmer – herding sheep and other small livestock; protecting home and property; and doing varied tasks for the modest working people of Belgium.They were prized in their homeland as police dogs and as war dogs.

wardogswIn 1914, Belgium produced the first war messenger dog. Her name was “Taki”, a Belgian Groenendael (Sheepdog). The January 1930 American Kennel GAZETTE contained a story about Taki, who eventually came to the United States as an old dog.

 In 1923, a statue was erected in Amsterdam to honor a renowned Tervuren, Albert, who was an accomplished police dog. Surviving photographs showing Tervuren, Groenendael and Malinois police and war dogs demonstrate their great popularity and success in those venues during that time.

 okc rubble april 1995Still today, the Tervuren's desire to learn and work, combined with their athletic and agile build and protective coats make them useful in a wide variety of pursuits.

The Belgian Tervuren has proven its excellence in many arenas: as search and rescue dogs, as assistance dogs, leader dogs for the blind, racing sled dogss, in protection, police, narcotic and bomb detection, and of course, in herding. The Tervuren has an enviable breed record as an outstanding performer in AKC events. The ratio of performance titles to registrations, and the ratio of breed Champions holding performance titles is among the top (if not the top) of all breeds.

 

 

In AKC History, the Belgian Tervuren is credited for being:

  • The first single dog of any breed to obtain the AKC title of Herding Trial Champion 
  • The first single dog of any breed to earn the combined titles of Ch/UDT/OTCH and be a High In Trial obedience winner 
  • The first single dog in the Herding Group (and 2nd all-breed) to win both Best In Show and High In Trial obedience at the same show
  • The first dog of any breed holding a Champion Tracker title to win a Best In Show
  • In 2002, the American Kennel Club awarded the prestigious ACE award for the top Search and Rescue dog to a Belgian Tervuren

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So proud are Tervuren owners of their dogs' accomplishments in performance venues that long ago the American Belgian Tervuren Club adopted as its official motto:

"A well balanced Belgian Tervuren has a Ch. on one end and a UDT on the other"

lu479w 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

For more history and a wealth of historical photos, click here to visit our archive pages.

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Judge Education Online Presentation - Guide for Judges

  • Introduction +

    Introduction Introduction Welcome to the ABTC online Judges' Education guide. The intent of this guide is to discuss and illustrate those points of the standard which deal with qualities most unique to the breed, which are commonly referred to as "type". It is directed to judges and aspiring judges of the breed under the AKC breed standard who already have general knowledge of soundness in the Herding breeds.  Copyright © American Belgian Tervuren Club, Inc. 2000-2009, all rights reserved.  Read More
  • Judges Responsibility +

    Judge's Responsibility The judge plays a vital role in the survival of the Belgian Tervuren as a functional herding dog with correct breed type. Championship titles, Group and Best In Show winners are sought after in pedigrees. Only when the dogs possessing correct type are the dogs rewarded by the judge in the ring, will the breed continue to improve.  Please judge positively. After all, all dogs have faults. The breed standard gives far more attention to describing the features the dog should possess, those which make him look and function like a Belgian Tervuren, than it does in listing faults.  Read More
  • History and Purpose +

    History and Purpose HISTORY AND PURPOSE: The Belgians were a rustic, brave dog, known for exceptional intelligence, athleticism and trainability. They were found working with the farmer – herding sheep and other small livestock; protecting home and property; and doing varied tasks for the modest working people of Belgium.They were prized in their homeland as police dogs and as war dogs. The Belgians share a common ancestry. Originally classified as simply long hair, short hair, and rough haired, irrespective of coloring, to this day in their homeland they remain a single breed with varieties, named according to their phenotype, or appearance, which is not Read More
  • Breed Character +

    Breed Character The Tervuren is a sheep herding breed and a versatile all-around worker. It is by nature an active and responsive dog, full of life and delighted to be with its owner. It is very zealous for the attention of its family, which accounts for its outstanding success and popularity as an owner-trained and handled breed.  In the ring The natural protective instincts of the Tervuren make it a breed which which does not immediately make friends with strangers. While they typically show much interest in interacting with their handler, it is not typical for an adult Tervuren to be overly Read More
  • General Appearance +

    General Appearance  General Appearance Silhouette counts. The first thing a judge should consider is whether the dog has the look which is unmistakably Tervuren. It is not a good Tervuren if it does not have correct silhouette, no matter how nice it may look or move.  The Tervuren stands naturally with proud carriage of head and neck over a balanced, square body having medium bone and balanced angulation front to rear. The slightly long, arched neck gives the head a most elegant carriage. It's straight, dense, natural falling coat should not obscure the outline. Faced with a black muzzle, alert high set Read More
  • Body Details +

    Body Details  sculpture by M. Fath, France, 1953 TheTervuren is a well-balanced square dog with medium bone structure.He has a nice neckline that is proudly carried over the wither which is slightly accentuated. The shoulders are laid back with forelegs set under the dog's chest. The rear angulation is balanced to the front, the hocks are vertical and the hind feet set comfortably below the point of the dog's rump - the dog stands squarely. The chest is deep, but not broad, with a smooth ascendant underline to the loin. Size and Substance Our standard describes a medium sized dog capable Read More
  • Head +

    Head Head The moderately long, cleanly chiseled head with balanced proportions, dark almond eyes and high set ears, combined an alert, intelligent and questioning expression easily distinguishes the Tervuren  from other breeds.  Well-chiseled, skin taut, long without exaggeration. Expression intelligent and questioning, indicating alertness, attention and readiness for action. Eyes dark brown, medium-size, slightly almond shape, not protruding. Light, yellow or round eyes are a fault. Ears triangular in shape, well-cupped, stiff, erect; height equal to width at base. Set high, the base of the ear does not come below the center of the eye. Hanging ears, as on a hound, Read More
  • Teeth +

    Teeth Teeth Full complement of strong white teeth, evenly set, meeting in a scissors or a level bite. Overshot and undershot teeth are a fault. An undershot bite such that there is a complete loss of contact by all the incisors is a disqualification. Broken or discolored teeth should not be penalized. Missing teeth are a fault. Four or more missing teeth are a serious fault. We ask that judges check the teeth gently from the side, rather than attempting to pry the mouth open. Please, do not pry open the mouth in the manner seen for Doberman Pinschers and Rottweilers. Read More
  • Gait +

    Gait Gait  Lively and graceful, covering the maximum ground with minimum effort.  Always in motion, seemingly never tiring, he shows ease of movement rather than hard driving action. He single tracks at a fast gait, the legs both front and rear converging toward the center line of gravity of the dog. Viewed from the side he exhibits full extension of both fore and hindquarters. The back line should remain firm and level, parallel to the line of motion. The gait is light and relaxed His natural tendency is to move in a circle, rather than a straight line. Padding, hackneying, weaving, Read More
  • Coat +

    Coat     The Belgian Tervuren is particularly adaptable to extremes of temperature or climate.The long guard hairs are straight, close fitting, and of medium harshness. The undercoat is dense, commensurate with climatic conditions. The female rarely has as long or as ornamented a coat as the male, and she should be considered equally regardless of this disparity.  The guard hairs of the coat must be long, close-fitting, straight and abumdant. The texture is of medium harshness, not silky or wiry. Wavy or curly hair is a fault. The undercoat is very dense, commensurate, however, with climatic conditions. The hair Read More
  • Color +

    Color COLOR: mahogany female, fawn male, both with black overlay, showing a range of acceptable coloring Preferred Tervuren coloring ranges rather widely, from rich fawn to a russet mahogany base color, all having a some degree of black overlay and a black mask. Disqualification: Solid black, solid liver, or any area of white except as specifiedon the chest, tips of toes, chin and muzzle are a DISQUALIFICATION (by this the standard means solid, without characteristic lighter underpinnings or contrasting overlay). Serious Faults:  A face with a complete absence of black. Absence of black overlay in mature dogs (make allowances for young dogs) Read More
  • Faults and Disqualifications +

    Faults and Disqualifications - including a Belgian comparison chart Any deviation from these specifications is a fault. In determining whether a fault is minor, serious, or major, these two factors should be used as a guide: The extent to which it deviates from the standard The extent to which such deviation would actually affect the working ability of the dog The Tervuren standard has disqualifications for    Size (Males under 23 inches or over 26.5 inches or females under 21 inches or over 24.5 inches) Ears (Hanging ears, as a hound) Bite (An undershot bite such that there is a complete loss Read More
  • How to Examine the Tervuren +

    How to Examine the Belgian Tervuren Here are some tips that will help you through an efficient, comprehensive breed-specific evaluation. Look at the profile Do not stare at the dog close-up Be pleasant and expect the dog to be also Check for missing teeth - gently from the sides check depth of chest, forechest, and shoulder angulation check placement of shoulder assembly check tail length  And of course, evaluate the many breed-specific and functional qualities that we talked about in this forum! Consider that the great majority of Tervuren are owner-handled.  The approach There is much that you can do to Read More
  • 2009 Quick Judge's Reference Brochure +

     Click here to open the 2-sided 3-fold printable 2009 Quick reference brochure (will open in another window). Follow your printer instructions for how to re-insert/align the paper to print on both sides. This brochure along with the 2007 Quick Guide are intended as fast easy printable reference sources for judging. Neither replaces in depth study such as the club seminars or judges education website. ABTC JEC Quickguide278.3 KB05/12/2012, 23:32 Read More
  • 2007 Quick Guide for judges +

     Click here to open the 1 page, printable 2007 Quick Guide Sheet (will open in another window). This, along with the 2 sided 2009 Quick Reference Guide, are intended to assist the judge as easily printed reference sources. Neither replaces in-depth learning such as from our approved seminars and website sources. Tervuren Quick Guide for Judges88.45 KB11/11/2012, 20:39 Read More
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